Review: The Lost by Sarah Beth Durst

  • Jun. 11th, 2014 at 11:51 AM


Summary: Lost your way?

Your dreams?

Yourself?

Welcome to Lost.

It was supposed to be a small escape. A few hours driving before turning around and heading home. But once you arrive in Lost...well, it's a place you really can't leave. Not until you're Found. Only the Missing Man can send you home. And he took one look at Lauren Chase and disappeared.

So Lauren is now trapped in the town where all lost things go-luggage, keys, dreams, lives-where nothing is permanent, where the locals go feral and where the only people who don't want to kill her are a handsome wild man called the Finder and a knife-wielding six-year-old girl. The only road out of town is engulfed by an impassable dust storm, and escape is impossible....

Until Lauren decides nothing-and no one-is going to keep her here anymore.


The Lost is a mixed bag that I still ended up enjoying. Although I think Durst’s transition to adult made her feel as if she needed to strip down her writing style (a lot of the sentences are very short) otherwise I think her first foray into adult fiction was a successful one.

Read the review at Bibliodaze!
The Heretic is the latest in the long-running General series by David Drake and one of several writers.  (The original series was co-written with S.M. Stirling. The first book in the latter series was co-written with Stirling, but Drake has switched co-writers since them.) I do not recommend the original series unless you are completely acclimated to Stirling’s early work, which was heavy on the “I have to show you how grotty and violent the world is with graphic eroticized sexual violence.”) 
 

Read this review on Rena's Hub of Random on Word Press.

Review: Conjured by Sarah Beth Durst

  • Aug. 28th, 2013 at 7:32 AM


Release Date: September 3rd, 2013
Summary: Eve has a new home, a new face, and a new name—but no memories of her past. She’s been told that she's in a witness protection program. That she escaped a dangerous magic-wielding serial killer who still hunts her. The only thing she knows for sure is that there is something horrifying in her memories the people hiding her want to access—and there is nothing they won’t say—or do—to her to get her to remember.

At night she dreams of a tattered carnival tent and buttons being sewn into her skin. But during the day, she shelves books at the local library, trying to not let anyone know that she can do things—things like change the color of her eyes or walk through walls. When she does use her strange powers, she blacks out and is drawn into terrifying visions, returning to find that days or weeks have passed—and she’s lost all short-term memories. Eve must find out who and what she really is before the killer finds her—but the truth may be more dangerous than anyone could have ever imagined.


A book that relies on a mystery propelling the plot forward runs the risk of no longer being interesting once the reader has found out that mystery. There are several main mysteries in Conjured; who is Eve, where did she come from, why can she not remember anything, why can she do brief bursts of great magic that makes her black out, and who’s hunting her?

Thankfully, even when we finally find all of this out, Conjured is still a great story.

Read the review at On The Nightstand.

Review: Love Devours by Sarah diemer

  • Aug. 9th, 2013 at 1:25 PM


Summary: We’re all afraid of monsters. They coil in our subconscious, slither along the edges of thought. Still we creep to the crackling fire to whisper their stories.

Love Devours is a collection of new fables for queer women, extracted from the bones of the dark: ominous fairy tales, sinister myths, dystopias rife with nightmares. But in the midst of monsters, love still struggles to find the light.

A witch traps a beast of the sea; a corpse is reanimated out of love; a muse drains her supplicant; a priestess worships in a church of wolves. Six monster stories lurk within these pages. Six heroines, sometimes monsters themselves, unearth romance, rebuild worlds, shatter spells. Their courage unveils the secret faces of humankind’s greatest compulsions: fear and love.

Come into the dark and be devoured.


See the review at On The Nightstand.

Review: Vessel by Sarah Beth Durst

  • Aug. 2nd, 2013 at 9:41 AM


Summary: Liyana has trained her entire life to be the vessel of a goddess. She will dance and summon her tribe’s deity, who will inhabit Liyana’s body and use magic to bring rain to the desert. But when the dance ends, Liyana is still there. Her tribe is furious–and sure that it is Liyana’s fault. Abandoned by her tribe, Liyana expects to die in the desert. Until a boy walks out of the dust in search of her.

Korbyn is a god inside his vessel, and a trickster god at that. He tells Liyana that five other gods are missing, and they set off across the desert in search of the other vessels. The desert tribes cannot survive without the magic of their gods. But the journey is dangerous, even with a god’s help. And not everyone is willing to believe the trickster god’s tale.

The closer she grows to Korbyn, the less Liyana wants to disappear to make way for her goddess. But she has no choice–she must die for her tribe to live. Unless a trickster god can help her to trick fate–or a human girl can muster some magic of her own.


I’ve been a fan of Sarah Beth Durst ever since I read her first novel, Into the Wild. Despite some mishaps along the way, she’s remained one of my favourite authors, and Vessel is yet another winning book from her.

Read the review at On The Nightstand.