My sister works as a narrator for ACX.com. She just finished her first audiobook, The Poppet and the Lune, by Madeline Claire Franklin, and ACX gave her 25 free download credits to give to book reviewers. She doesn't really know any reviewers and didn't know where to start, so I wanted to ask here and see if there are any bloggers who might be interested in a free copy of the audiobook for review? Or any recommendations of bloggers who might be interested?

Behind the cut, audiobook trailer, book description and Goodreads link for anyone who wants to know more )


Over at Bibliodaze I have reviews up for THIRD DAUGHTER by Susan Kaye Quinn and THE FALL OF LADY GRACE by Julia London!

New books from Meg Cabot

  • May. 2nd, 2014 at 8:08 PM
If any of you are fans of Meg Cabot's books, she posted a huge announcement today: both The Princess Diaries series and The Mediator series (both YA) are getting adult spin-off series, with the first installments of each being published next year. The Princess Diaries is also getting a middle-grade spin-off: From the Notebooks of a Middle-School Princess.

The Mediator spin-off follows protagonist Suze Simon starting her first job after graduating college, and solving an ancient murder with her now-fiancé Dr. Jesse de Silva. (*fangirl shrieks*) Oh, and Paul Slater is going to be in it, too. (*fangirl boos and hisses*)

Both Princess Diaries spin-offs tie into each other: the adult book, Royal Wedding, follows Princess Mia Thermopolis as she plans her wedding to Michael Moscovitz and discovers she has a long-lost half-sister. The middle-grade series is told from this sister's perspective. It's also worth nothing that Mia's half-sister is biracial! It will be interesting to see how that's explored.

Any fans of these series? What do you think about these series getting spin-offs? I knew a seventh Mediator book was on the way because she mentioned it at a book signing I attended a couple of years ago, but I definitely wasn't expecting an adult series*! The Princess Diaries was also a huge shock. She definitely kept those updates under her hat!

*I am infinitely pleased about this—when the books first came out, I was the "same age" as Suze. It's exciting to see that Suze and Jesse have essentially grown up with me XD

Anyway, if anyone's interested, I'll be posting updates about the new Mediator book(s)—cover, publication dates, etc.—as well as the upcoming TV series over at [community profile] mediatorfans :-)

Review: The Freedom Maze by Delia Sherman

  • Dec. 11th, 2013 at 8:45 AM


Summary: Thirteen-year-old Sophie isn’t happy about spending the summer of 1960 at her grandmother’s old house in the bayou. Bored and lonely, she can’t resist exploring the house’s maze, or making an impulsive wish for a fantasy-book adventure with herself as the heroine. What she gets instead is a real adventure: a trip back in time to 1860 and the race-haunted world of her family’s Louisiana sugar plantation. Here, President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation is still two years in the future and passage of the Thirteenth Amendment is almost four years away. And here, Sophie is mistaken, by her own ancestors, for a slave.

At some point during The Freedom Maze, I became so engrossed in the story that I didn’t even want to pause to write down notes for a review later. Unfortunately this means that my review is probably going to be a little all over the place, but oh well.

This is the third novel I’ve read about someone being sent back in time to the mid 19th century and being forced to be a part of the slave plantations. The first, of course, being Kindred, and the second being Zetta Elliott’s A Wish After Midnight.

See the review at On The Nightstand.


Summary: Here are the numbers of Ann Galardi’s life:

She is 16.
And a size 17.
Her perfect mother is a size 6.
Her Aunt Jackie is getting married in 8 weeks, and wants Ann to be her bridesmaid.
So Ann makes up her mind: Time to lose 45 pounds (more or less) in two
months.

Welcome to the world of informercial diet plans, terrifying wedding dance lessons, endless run-ins with the cutest guy Ann’s ever seen—and some surprises about her NOT-so-perfect mother.

And there’s one more thing. It’s all about feeling comfortable in your own skin -- no matter how you add it up!


Being a fat lady myself, I tend to stay away from YA books (or any books really) that deal with weight issues. All too often it ends with the main character losing weight and suddenly becoming beautiful and desirable and wonderful where she wasn’t before. While I do obviously support healthy eating habits and exercise for those who can manage it without damaging their bodies, I get tired of seeing the same message in weight books: Lose weight because you’re worthless until you do, you big fatty.

See the review at On The Nightstand.